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Listen to Audio Recordings That Inspired ‘The Conjuring 2’

Wed, 05/25/2016 - 13:24

With just over two weeks until The Conjuring 2 hits theaters on June 10th, Warner Bros. has released a short featurette that showcases some of the actual recordings the Warrens captured during their investigations in Enfield.

Although the clip isn’t that long nor are the recordings terribly exciting, it’s still rather cool to hear fragments of what Ed and Lorraine Warren were a part of. And while I said that the recordings presented weren’t terribly exciting, that doesn’t mean that there isn’t a strong air of eerie hostility about them…

In the sequel to the smash hit, “Paranormal investigators Ed and Lorraine Warren (Patrick Wilson and Vera Farmiga) travel to 1977 England to help single mom Peggy Hodgson and her four children, particularly daughter Janet (played by Madison Wolfe).

[Set Visit Report] We Visited the Filming Locations of James Wan’s The Conjuring 2!

In theaters June 10, 2016, The Conjuring 2 is said to open with The Amityville Horror case. After, the sequel will tell of the infamous “Enfield Poltergeist,” which took place at a council house in Brimsdown village, borough of Enfield, England during the late 1970s.

Rounding out the cast are Frances O’Connor (“The Missing”) as the single mom, with newcomers Lauren Esposito, Patrick McAuley and Benjamin Haigh as her children; Maria Doyle Kennedy (“Orphan Black”); Simon Delaney (“Roy”); Franka Potente (“The Bridge”); and Simon McBurney (Mission Impossible: Rogue Nation).

In addition to directing the film, Wan wrote the screenplay with Carey and Chad Hayes, and David Leslie Johnson.

Categories: Horror News

15 Fun Facts About the Universal Monsters Franchise!

Wed, 05/25/2016 - 13:01

Universal’s classic monsters are about to return in a big way. The studio is currently planning remakes of many of its iconic horror films like The Mummy, The Wolf Man, The Invisible Man and The Creature From the Black Lagoon, all of which will take place in the same universe. Clearly they’re hoping to emulate the success of Marvel, but to be fair, Universal was doing the whole cinematic universe thing long before it was cool. From the 1930s into the early 1950s, they were pumping out monster sequel after monster sequel leading into crossover events like Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man and House of Dracula. Looking back, the series as a whole is quite messy, but that only makes it more fun for hardcore fans to discuss, and stories from behind the scenes are utterly fascinating. Here are 15 fun facts about the original Universal Monsters franchise.

15. The writer of The Mummy was present for the opening of Tutankhamun’s tomb

Most fans know that The Mummy (1932) was inspired by the real life opening of Tutankhamun’s tomb, but not in the sense that the screenwriter read about it in a book and went from there. No, the movie was written by a former journalist who, a decade earlier, covered the event himself.

Before landing a gig in Hollywood, The Mummy writer John Lloyd Balderston was a foreign correspondent for New York World, and he wrote extensively about the opening of Tutankhamun’s tomb in 1922. Originally, Universal’s film was going to follow a 300-year-old magician living in San Francisco, but when Balderston joined the project, he moved the story to Egypt, renamed the main character Imhotep, and focused in on the Scroll of Thoth.

Balderston also worked on Frankenstein, Dracula, Bride of Frankenstein, and Dracula’s Daughter, so he’s easily one of the most significant creative minds of the Universal Monsters series. Considering how influential all the aforementioned movies were, who knows if the horror genre itself would be the same had Balderston not taken that reporting job at New York World.

14. The Mummy’s eyes were blacked out frame by frame in The Mummy’s Hand

The antagonist in The Mummy’s Hand has a unique look to him, as evidenced in closeups where his eyes are totally black. It’s simple and effective, giving the character an otherworldly touch. This would be easy enough to accomplish today, but keep in mind that this was 1940, so the special effect was no cinch. During every single closeup of Kharis in The Mummy’s Hand, his eyes and mouth had to be manually blackened frame-by-frame. To put that in perspective, a 10 second shot in a movie generally contains 240 individual frames. That’s an extraordinary amount of additional work just to make the villain ever-so-slightly creepier.

13. Wallace Ford’s character inexplicably changes names

Back in the 1940s, before the advent of the Internet and home video, filmmakers didn’t care as much about continuity as they do now. After all, who was going to remember minor details about a 60-minute movie they saw years earlier and never again? This was especially the case in the Universal Monsters franchise, as names of characters and locations change all the time for no reason. For instance, Wallace Ford plays a man named Babe Jenson in The Mummy’s Hand, but in the sequel, The Mummy’s Tomb, he is now referred to as Babe Hanson. No explanation is given. Maybe he got remarried to someone who coincidentally had an extremely similar last name?

There’s another example in Son of Frankenstein: the character of Ygor suddenly becomes Igor in this sequel. You can only really tell the difference by looking at the credits, so it was probably just a typo, and in the next film, his name goes back to Ygor again. How about Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man? The town is called Vasaria, but in House of Frankenstein, which takes place in the same continuity, it’s now Visaria instead. In 2016, this sounds totally ridiculous; imagine going to see Avatar 2 and the name of the planet is now Pandoria. But in the 1940s, you would need the most exceptional memory on the planet to pick up on these trivial mistakes.

12. Applying makeup took basically the entire day

For just about every one of the Universal monster movies, applying the makeup took an insanely long amount time. Starting off with The Mummy, transforming Boris Karloff into the creature was an eight hour process. Makeup artist Jack Pierce would begin working on Karloff at 11:00 AM and finish at 7:00 PM, with shooting then lasting from 7:00 PM until 2:00 AM. Then, after filming, it took another two hours to get the makeup off. Karloff has called this “the most trying ordeal I [had] ever endured,” although luckily for him, he at least doesn’t wear the iconic bandages for the majority of The Mummy.

In Frankenstein, the makeup application took four hours, half the time as in The Mummy, but in this case it had to be done every single day. This costume weighed nearly 50 pounds, and the movie was filmed during the summer, so we can only imagine what was going through Karloff’s head at the end of a 14-hour day. For The Wolf Man, putting on the makeup took six hours, and another three were required to get it off at the conclusion of shooting. Imagine sitting in a chair for six straight hours having rubber prosthetics and yak hairs slowly applied to your face. Not exactly glamorous, and Lon Chaney Jr. and Jack Pierce reportedly hated each other by the time production ended.

11. Most of the Mummy movies take place in the future

Every Mummy movie takes place a few years after the previous one, though rarely is it stated what year we’re in specifically. That’s probably because when you actually add up all the time skips, the sequels go hilariously far into the future considering that they all have such an antiquated look. The original Mummy opens in 1921 before jumping ahead 10 years to 1931. The Mummy’s Hand skips another decade, unfolding during May of 1940. In The Mummy’s Tomb, it’s said that 30 years have passed, so we’re now all the way in 1970. Despite that, the characters continuously reference World War II as an ongoing event, as if the screenwriters just forgot what time period they were supposed to be in. Or did they think World War II would stretch into the 1970s?

And it keeps going! The Mummy’s Ghost is set two years later, in 1972. That’s not so bad, but just when we thought the massive time jumps may come to an end, The Mummy’s Curse takes place 25 years in the future. That means we are now in the year 1997, yet the entire film looks like it’s set in the 1800s, and the fact that it is now close to the turn of the century has absolutely no impact on the way director Leslie Goodwins approaches the story. Just look at the picture above from The Mummy’s Curse and try to imagine it occurring during the same year that Titanic was released in theaters, Bill Clinton began his second term, and everyone was playing Nintendo 64.

10. A line in Frankenstein was missing for years

During the famous “It’s alive” scene in Frankenstein, the doctor goes on to say, “In the name of God, now I know what it feels like to be God!” That line is on all the current home video releases, but the audio was missing for a period of time. It was present during the 1931 premiere, but when Universal rereleased the film in the late 1930s, the censors decided this dialogue was sacrilegious and needed to be removed. In the new version, Dr. Frankenstein can still be seen mouthing the words, but his lines are drowned out by thunder. Well, that’s one way to deal with the issue.

On the earliest video releases, the line was kind of restored, but it’s very hard to hear because, believe it or not, nobody had a good recording of the original audio. It was only years later when a clean version was found on a Vitaphone disc that the dialogue was inserted back in perfectly, and now it’s not even noticeable that anything was changed. Thanks, Vitaphone!

9. The Bride of Frankenstein was inspired by swan behavior

Even though she’s such an iconic character and is considered to be an official member of the Universal Monsters lineup, The Bride of Frankenstein sure doesn’t do much. She literally only has five minutes of screentime before she dies and never returns in any sequel. Has any other character made such an impression in five minutes? The Bride mostly jerks her head about and hisses, and as it turns out, actress Elsa Lanchester based this on the swans she would observe at Regent’s Park in London. “They’re really very nasty creatures,” she once said. And just so the audio would sound even stranger, her hissing sounds were run backwards in post-production.

8. Boris Karloff didn’t want Frankenstein’s Monster to speak in the sequel

After being mute throughout the first Frankenstein, the monster learns to speak in the sequel, Bride of Frankenstein. Boris Karloff really hated that idea, arguing that it ruins the charm of the character. He explained, “Speech! Stupid! My argument was that if the monster had any impact or charm, it was because he was inarticulate – this great, lumbering, inarticulate creature.” Another side-effect of this development was that the monster’s cheeks now appear less hollow. That’s because during speaking scenes Karloff had to keep his dental plate in, whereas he took it out during production of the original. Karloff would ultimately get his way, though, as in the very next movie, the monster goes back to being mute.

7. James Whale didn’t want to make a Frankenstein sequel

Speaking of Bride of Frankenstein objections, director James Whale objected to the entire concept of making a Frankenstein sequel, saying that he had “squeezed the idea try.” He had a point, to be fair, but Universal was thinking about a follow-up as early as 1931, which explains the last-minute decision to have Henry survive the movie.

The studio really wanted Whale on board for part two, especially after his next film, The Invisible Man, was a huge hit. Whale still wasn’t into the idea, but he finally agreed to sign on in late 1934. The studio was apparently confident he’d come around; they were putting out press releases about the sequel, then titled The Return of Frankenstein, as early as 1933.

When Whale came aboard, there were already several versions of the script that had been completed. He was not a fan of them, reportedly saying of the existing screenplay, “It stinks to heaven.” It wasn’t until Whale hired John L. Balderston, who worked on an early draft of the first movie, that Frankenstein having a mate was delved into, as this is mentioned briefly in the original novel.

6. The Invisible Man effect was accomplished using black velvet 

The special effects in The Invisible Man can be taken for granted today considering anyone can pull them off using Final Cut and an iPhone. But imagine how hard it was in 1933, not too long after motion pictures were invented, to make an actor’s skin seem to be invisible. How do you make that happen with such primitive technology? Visual effects artists John Fulton himself was unsure it could be done, saying in an interview that the script “bristled with difficult special process scenes, and I wondered if, even with our modern process techniques, we could possibly make all the amazing scenes called for.”

Fulton came up with a novel solution. First, the scene was shot with all the other actors, who just had to pretend the Invisible Man was there. Then, the filmmakers had Claude Rains wear a black velvet suit and act on a completely black velvet set, combining that with a matte painting. If you want to get technical with it, Fulton explained, “From this negative we made a print and a dupe negative, which we intensified to serve as mattes for optical printing. Then with an ordinary printer we proceeded to make our composite: first we printed from the positive of the background and normal action, using the intensified negative matte to mask off the area where our invisible man’s clothing was to move. Then we printed again, using the positive matte to shield the area already printed and thus printing in the moving clothes from our ‘trick’ negative.”

That is a lot of work, huh? Though some of the Universal movies are rather dated, The Invisible Man still looks shockingly good for a film made over 80 years ago, and that’s all thanks to the magnificent work of the brilliant John Fulton.

5. Frankenstein’s Monster originally had dialogue in Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man

In the script for Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man, Frankenstein’s Monster had dialogue all throughout, but every single line was cut from the finished product. This was clearly done at the last minute, as there are several scenes where you can still see Bela Lugosi’s mouth moving without any words coming out. What happened? Apparently, test screening audiences all burst out laughing when they heard Lugosi speaking as the monster with a Hungarian accent. They couldn’t take it seriously, which is odd considering Lugosi already spoke as the monster in the previous film, Ghost of Frankenstein. In that case he was performing as Ygor trapped inside the monster’s body, though.

The original Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man script also recapped for audiences why the monster is behaving so strangely and outstretching his arms (he went blind in Ghost of Frankenstein), but this was part of the dialogue that was removed, leaving a lot of viewers confused. Wouldn’t it be better to have them laugh at an accent than to have them not know what the heck is going on in the story? Evidently Universal didn’t think so.

4. Son of Dracula is the first time anyone turns into a bat

What was the first movie in the Universal Monsters franchise to depict someone turning into a bat? Obviously Dracula with Bela Lugosi, right? Nope. It wasn’t until 13 years after the release of the original that this iconic image was put to screen. In Dracula, Bela Lugosi’s character does indeed turn into a bat at one point in the film, but the transformation does not take place in front of the camera. It finally happens in Son of Dracula, the third film in the series. The effect was pulled off once again by John Fulton, the man who came up with the crazy black velvet trick on The Invisible Man. The bat transformation would soon become a staple of every vampire movie, despite the fact that it is completely absent from the first two Dracula installments.

3. There are four Frankenstein Monsters in House of Dracula 

House of Dracula is one of Universal’s greatest crossover movies, featuring Dracula, the Wolf Man and the Frankenstein Monster. But it doesn’t just include one Frankenstein Monster; there are actually four of them in the film. The main actor playing the monster is Glenn Strange, but there’s also brief footage of Lon Chaney Jr’s monster from The Ghost of Frankenstein. Then there’s Boris Karloff as the monster in a scene where footage is lifted from The Bride of Frankenstein. Finally, the finale features clips from The Ghost of Frankenstein in which the monster is played by Lon Chaney Jr. and his stunt double, Eddie Parker. To summarize, between Strange, Chaney Jr., Karloff and Parker, the are nearly enough Frankenstein Monsters in this movie alone to make up an Avengers-style team.

2. The guy playing the Creature from the Black Lagoon could barely see anything

Being covered in pounds of makeup during filming was a pain, but wearing monster suits presented their own challenges. On Creature from The Black Lagoon, Ricou Browning had to wear a massive creature costume that overheated instantly and made it so that he could not sit down for the entire 14-hour work day. In addition how uncomfortable the suit was, it was virtually impossible to see in it. Browning once said that he had an incredibly hard time making out his surroundings during the entire production.

He explained, “I didn’t wear any goggles or [a] facemask and the eye of the suit sat about an inch from my eye…it’s kind of like looking through a keyhole with blurred vision, so it was difficult seeing.”

In fact, that lead to some dangerous mistakes on set. During the cave sequence, Browning accidentally knocked Julie Adams’ head into the artificial rocks. Going back and watching that scene, then, it’s not as scary if we view it as an overworked, tired actor struggling to navigate through a fake cave set while a terrified actress prays her co-star doesn’t severely injure her in the process.

1. Universal nearly stopped making monster movies a few years in

The original Universal Monsters series goes into the 1950s, but it almost ended much earlier than that. After 1936, the studio dropped monster films from its production lineup completely, and that could have been the end of it. But one theater in Los Angeles can be credited for bringing Dracula, Frankenstein, the Wolf Man and the rest of the gang out of retirement.

In 1938, the owner of the Regina Theatre in Beverly Hills was struggling to stay in business, and so he made a deal to show a triple feature of Dracula, Frankenstein and Son of Kong. The intention was to have this feature run for only four days, but it was an unexpected hit, with lines around the block for days. The Motion Picture Daily reported at the time, “Beverly Hills traffic stopped around the house the first night. The police helped keep the customers in line…The grosses had the Regina cashier dizzy.” Soon enough, the four-day event was extended indefinitely.

Other theaters began getting in on the madness, and Universal realized that there was an enormous demand for these monsters to return to the big screen. Instantly, they put additional sequels into production, and Son of Frankenstein was released in January of 1939. Yeah, they didn’t wait very long. It’s unclear if Universal would have ever resumed production on monster movies otherwise, so 1940s horror was dramatically shaped by one random theater owner attempting to make a quick buck.

Categories: Horror News

Scared of Lawn Gnomes? These Will Only Make Things Worse

Wed, 05/25/2016 - 12:01

I hate gardening with a passion. I’m of the firm belief that I’ll either let nature take its course OR if something annoys me enough then I’ll simply rip out the root, salt the earth, lay down a bunch of rocks, and be done with the whole thing. I know, it’s very Biblical but that’s just the kind of person I am.

I will say however that if I possessed a green thumb, I’d want to bring my love of horror into the garden. And what better way to do that then by having creepy lawn gnomes scattered throughout? And thanks to the folk over at Revenant FX, I can do exactly that.

From gnomes themed after iconic slashers like Friday the 13th and A Nightmare on Elm Street to standard zombie gnomes, they’ve got adorably terrifying critters that will make sure every neighbor avoids you like the plague…or become your best friend. Either way, winner winner, chicken dinner!

If you want to terrify your garden, you can snag your own gnomes right here.

Categories: Horror News

The Classic Lovecraft-inspired ‘Lurking Fear’ is Coming to Blu-ray

Wed, 05/25/2016 - 11:47

C. Courtney Joyner’s H.P. Lovecraft-inspired Lurking Fear is coming to blu-ray on June 15th via Full Moon Features. It is the first time it appears remastered on the format and is digitally restored from the original 35mm camera negative.

The town of Leffert’s Corners has been plagued by unearthly beings for decades, and now there is only a few people left, including the local priest and a woman traumatised by the death of her sister. But when John Martense turns up to claim his illicit family fortune, with bad guys in pursuit, the last stand had become a lot more complicated….
What everyone is not aware of are the humanoid creatures lurking underneath the holy grounds!

Lurking Fear stars John Finch, Blade Adams, Ashley Laurence (Hellraiser), Jeffrey Combs (Re-animator), and Vincent Schiavelli (Lord of Illusions).!<--more-->

Categories: Horror News

Danger Lurks Below in New German ‘The Shallows’ Poster

Wed, 05/25/2016 - 10:56

A new German poster for the upcoming shark survival horror film The Shallows has been released and can be seen below. The tagline “Kein normaler tag am strand” translates to “Not a normal day at the beach“, which is one hell of an understatement!

In the taut thriller The Shallows, penned by Tony Jaswinski, Nancy (Blake Lively) is surfing alone on a secluded beach when she is attacked by a great white shark and stranded just a short distance from shore. Though she is only 200 yards from her survival, getting there proves the ultimate contest of wills, requiring all of Nancy’s ingenuity, resourcefulness, and fortitude.

It was directed by Orphan and House of Wax‘s Jaume Collet-Serra.

The Shallows comes out June 29th.

Categories: Horror News

The ‘Morgan’ Trailer Delivers a Strong ‘Alien’ Vibe

Wed, 05/25/2016 - 10:33

Yesterday, we posted a few photos from Luke Scott’s upcoming sci-fi thriller Morgan, which was produced by his father Ridley Scott (Prometheus, Blade Runner). Today, a teaser trailer has been released and it’s gotten me incredibly excited for this movie!

The trailer makes use of empty hallway shots, many of which are eerily reminiscent of the hallways in the Nostromo in Alien. There is also this deeply unsettling offkey lullaby that hovers over the cold, stark visuals and everything adds to a sense of dread and terror. I know that most trailers these days give away pretty much everything but this does the exact opposite. It tells me just enough to make me want to know more and nothing else. I’m 100% hooked.

In Morgan:
A corporate troubleshooter (Kate Mara) is sent to a remote, top-secret location, where she is to investigate and evaluate a terrifying accident. She learns the event was triggered by a seemingly innocent “human,” who presents a mystery of both infinite promise and incalculable danger.

Luke Scott tells EW, “What ‘Morgan’ really alludes to is human beings becoming, in a sense, the creator. Not in a traditional religious sense, but an idea that we have the capabilities to become our own creator. And what I suspect could happen — we’ve seen it in all these movies, whether it’s Frankenstein or Metropolis — it’s the creation of a being that is greater than the creator.

Morgan stars Kate Mara (“American Horror Story”), Anya Taylor-Joy (The Witch), Rose Leslie, Boyd Holbrook, and Paul Giamatti. Ridley Scott, Michael Schaefer, and Mark Huffam will all be acting as producers.

Categories: Horror News

Sony Pictures Nabs Untitled ‘Pacific Heights’-esque Adult Thriller

Wed, 05/25/2016 - 10:22

Sony Pictures has snatched up an “untitled microbudget adult thriller”, according to Deadline. The deal was closed based on a pitch by Lori Evans Taylor, who was a writer on the TV show “Wicked Wicked Games” and producer on “1,000 Ways to Die”. Akiva Goldsman (Constantine, Paranormal Activity 2, 3, & 4) will act as producer.

According to the site, “The plot revolves around a couple who rent out their home to a woman who begins to invade their lives.” No further information has been released.

Sounds kinda like the ’90 thriller Pacific Heights, which starred Matthew Modine (Full Metal Jacket), Melanie Griffith (Cecil B. Demented), and Michael Keaton (Beetlejuice, Batman). However, I’ll fully admit that the above short description can be reminiscent of a lot of films.

Categories: Horror News

The Joe Dante-Produced ‘Dark’ Gets a Release Date

Wed, 05/25/2016 - 10:10

The indie thriller Dark (review) has been spoken about online for a long time and today it’s finally been announced by Fangoria that the film will be hitting VOD on June 7th.

The debut narrative feature by director Nick Basile (American Carny), Dark is written by Elias (Gut) and executive produced by Joe Dante (Gremlins).

Kate, a struggling 30-something model with a troubled past, has just moved into her girlfriend Leah’s Brooklyn loft, but already doubts about their relationship have begun to loom. When Leah leaves for the weekend, Kate unexpectedly finds herself alone in the apartment in the midst of the worst blackout in North American history. As darkness falls over the city, Kate’s paranoia grows and she begins to believe someone in the building is stalking her. With no one to help her and escape out of reach, Kate is forced to confront her deepest fears as she fights to survive through the night.

Dark stars Whitney Able (Monsters), Alexandra Breckenridge (The Walking Dead), Brendan Sexton III (Boys Don’t Cry), and Michael Eklund (The Call).<--more-->

Categories: Horror News

Bloody Hammers Ooze Mystery “When the Reaper Comes” (Exclusive)

Wed, 05/25/2016 - 10:00

We’ve teamed up with occult rockers Bloody Hammers to bring you the exclusive music video premiere for their new song “When the Reaper Comes”. The black and white video embraces minimalism and an old-school horror aesthetic to create something haunting. The track comes from their upcoming album Lovely Sort of Death.

Vocalist/guitarist/bassist Anders Manga tells BD:

Many times a band will release the fastest, most in-your-face track they have as a first single. “Lovely Sort of Death” has some fast tracks, but it is also more versatile than that. I decided to do something different and go with ‘The Reaper Comes’ because it accurately portrays how I was feeling at the time the album was written, while snowed in at the top of a mountain.

Lovely Sort of Death comes out August 5th via Napalm Records.

Keyboard/organist Devallia adds, “The video was shot along the Blue Ridge Parkway near Asheville. People kept stopping by while we were shooting, only to be horrified. Eventually we were tired of trying to hide the scythe. We would just smile and wave, and tell them don’t fear the reaper.

Bloody Hammers online:
Official Website
Facebook

Categories: Horror News

Wesley Snipes Talks Possibility of ‘Blade 4’

Tue, 05/24/2016 - 20:03

Wesley Snipes is really keen on donning the leather trench coat and vampire fangs once again it seems. Back in September of last year, we posted on how Snipes said that conversations happening for a fourth entry in the Blade series but that was the last we heard of it.

Earlier today, Snipes took to Twitter to once again make it clear that he’s game and “sharpening my teeth“. However, as was the case then and is still the case now, the ball is, “…in Marvel’s court“. So, there’s not much to report aside from the fact that Snipes is still game to return and he’s simply waiting to see if Marvel has any plans for his return.

The last time we saw Snipes as Blade was in 2004’s Blade: Trinity, where the vampire slayer took on Dracula.

Additionally, there was supposed to be a new arc in his storyline with the comic seriesBlade: The Hunter“, which would’ve followed the slayer’s 16-year-old daughter. However, that series was delayed and I can’t find anything else about it.


When it comes to another BLADE, there's always a possibility.

Categories: Horror News

A Room Goes Missing in This Clip From Darren Bousman’s ‘Abattoir’

Tue, 05/24/2016 - 20:03

Darren Lynn Bousman is building a new kind of horror with Abattoir, which will premiere at the upcoming Los Angeles Film Festival.

“Abattoir centers on a real estate reporter who unearths an urban legend about a house being built from rooms where horrific tragedies have occurred. The investigation ultimately leads to the enigmatic Jebediah Crone and the answer to the terrifying question, ‘How do you build a haunted house?’ 

How do you build a haunted house? The enigmatic Jebediah Crone knows how. This clip, via EW, shows that the secret it stealing rooms from straight out a house…

Dayton Callie, Joe Anderson (Hercules), Jessica Lowndes (Altitude, Autopsy) and Lin Shaye (Insidious) star.

Bousman also reteamed with his Saw III and star J. LaRose, with Bryan Batt of “Mad Men” fame also taking on a role.

Bousman shot Abattoir in New Orleans from a script by Christopher Monfette.

Dayton Callie is already set to return in a sequel.

Categories: Horror News

‘Deadlight: Director’s Cut’ Shows Off Its Survival Mode

Tue, 05/24/2016 - 19:38

Tequila Works’ moody, post-apocalyptic platformer is being reanimated with the Deadlight: Director’s Cut, due next month for PC, PS4 and Xbox One. The game originally released back in 2012 — TJ and I did a co-op review of it — to a mostly warm reception. Its an incredibly stylish, albeit mildly frustrating to play, 2.5D sidescroller with darkly atmospheric visuals and a penchant for environmental puzzles.

It’s also set in the 1980s, apparently. I don’t remember that at all.

When Deadlight returns, it’ll come with improved controls, new animations, added support for 1080p, and a new wave survival mode called, uh, Survival Mode. You can have a look at that in the trailer below.

The Deadlight: Director’s Cut releases June 21 for PC, PS4 and Xbox One.

Categories: Horror News

The Rock’s ‘Big Trouble in Little China’ Remake Still Happening

Tue, 05/24/2016 - 18:36

Although it’s still not clear if the new Halloween is a reboot/remake or a sequel, let us not forget that another John Carpenter movie is in the pipeline for a remake: the 1986 adventure/horror Big Trouble in Little China. Announced last year, the film will be produced by Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson (who will also star) and is being written by Ashely Miller and Zack Stentz. However, since last summer, when Johnson stated that he wanted Carpenter’s involvement in some form, we haven’t heard anything else.

However, in a recent interview with Fandango, Johnson made it clear that the movie is still on his plate. “That’s happening, man! That’s happening, that’s happening. And again, that’s one of those things where you gotta take really good care of it,” he explained.

So, while nothing concrete has come forth aside from The Rock’s word, it still seems that this is a guarantee at some point down the line.

I’m not the biggest fan of everything Johnson has done but I will fully admit that he’s highly entertaining, so this is absolutely something I’m going to keep my eye on.

Categories: Horror News

16th Annual Screamfest Hits Los Angeles this October

Tue, 05/24/2016 - 18:30

America’s largest and longest running horror film festival, Screamfest, is proud to announce that the 16th annual event will take place from Oct. 18-27, 2016 at the TCL Chinese 6 Theatres in Hollywood. Actress Lydia Hearst (Condemned, #Horror) will serve as ambassador for the festival.

“I’m honored to serve as ambassador for Screamfest,” said Hearst, whose film Condemned premiered at last year’s festival.  “Screamfest provides an amazing platform for filmmakers and actors like me to showcase our latest work and to receive direct feedback from the horror and genre community.”

Screamfest is currently accepting submissions for the festival through Aug. 1, 2016. Films from around the globe are expected to screen at the festival. Winners will receive a 24 karat gold dipped skull trophy designed by the legendary, Academy award-winning special make-up effects creator, Stan Winston, who partnered with the festival until his passing.  All screenings are open to the general public.

“We’re excited to showcase the new work of American and international filmmakers for horror movie enthusiasts,” said Rachel Belofsky, Screamfest Founder and Festival Director. “Over the last 16 years, we have launched careers and helped garnered distribution for filmmakers. We’re proud of the work we showcase year after year.”

The festival is best known for discovering Paranormal Activity in 2007. Other past premieres include 30 Days of Night, Let the Right One In, The Grudge, The Fourth Kind, The Collection, Trick ‘r’ Treat, The Human Centipede and Diary of the Dead.

Wes Craven, John Carpenter, Sam Raimi, Clive Barker, Eli Roth, James Wan, Zack Snyder, William Friedkin, John Landis and James Gunn are just a few filmmakers who have supported the festival year after year.

Screamfest is a 501c3 non-profit organization dedicated to showcasing and furthering the careers of talented filmmakers. Screamfest is supported in part by the L.A. County Arts Commission and the City of Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs.   For more information, visit, screamfestla.com.

Categories: Horror News

Is Adam Wingard Also in Talks for ‘Halloween’?!

Tue, 05/24/2016 - 18:16

This morning we told you that Oculus, Hush and Ouija 2 director Mike Flanagan was in talks to continue his relationship with Blumhouse by directing the next installment of Halloween, which brings John Carpenter back to the franchise as executive producer.

Another huge name could be in the mix.

Adam Wingard went on a tweet storm (see below), fueling speculation that he’s also in contention for the dream gig that would send him to Haddonfield to resurrect Michael Myers. Obviously, there’s no confirmation as of this writing, just speculation.

Wingard is a huge fan of the Halloween franchise, which helped inspire You’re Next and its score. After directing A Horrible Way to Die, and the first two V/H/S films for Bloody Disgusting, he’s been on a complete tear having helmed You’re Next, The Guest as well as the upcoming The Woods for Lionsgate, and “Outcast” for Cinemax and “The Walking Dead” creator Robert Kirkman. He’s also set to begin production on Death Note for Netflix this summer.

Both directors are exciting choices, and no matter who ends up behind the camera we’re going to be in for a massive Halloween treat come 2017.

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— Adam Wingard (@AdamWingard) May 24, 2016

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— Adam Wingard (@AdamWingard) May 24, 2016

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— Adam Wingard (@AdamWingard) May 24, 2016

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— Adam Wingard (@AdamWingard) May 24, 2016

Categories: Horror News

Kate Mara Looks Pissed in ‘Morgan’

Tue, 05/24/2016 - 17:58

First images from the upcoming sci-fi thriller Morgan have been released and can be seen below, via EW. The film is the directorial debut of Luke Scott, son of Ridley Scott (Alien, Blade Runner).

The film follows Kate Mara who is, “…a corporate troubleshooter who’s sent to a remote location to evaluate an artificially created, rapidly developing lifeform.

Luke Scott tells EW, “What Morgan really alludes to is human beings becoming, in a sense, the creator. Not in a traditional religious sense, but an idea that we have the capabilities to become our own creator. And what I suspect could happen — we’ve seen it in all these movies, whether it’s Frankenstein or Metropolis — it’s the creation of a being that is greater than the creator.

Morgan also stars Anya Taylor-Joy (The Witch), Rose Leslie, Boyd Holbrook, and Paul Giamatti. Ridley Scott, Michael Schaefer, and Mark Huffam will all be acting as producers.

Categories: Horror News

Behold ‘Alien’ Storyboards Drawn by Ridley Scott Himself

Tue, 05/24/2016 - 17:42

The 1979 sci-fi/horror film Alien is pretty much considered to be one of the pinnacles of the genre. The introduction of the Xenomorph and facehugger pretty much cemented the film as one of the most important and influential of its kind, even if some think it was a blatant ripoff.

Director Ridley Scott crafted a masterpiece, making a film that was serious and expertly designed. And newly surfaced storyboards that were drawn by Scott himself show just how detailed he got with his vision, making sure that every thought came forth in the final product. These storyboards can be seen below.

Scott is currently filming Alien: Covenant, the sequel to Prometheus.

[H/T Imgur]

Categories: Horror News

H.P. Lovecraft’s “The Lurking Fear” Coming to Vinyl

Tue, 05/24/2016 - 17:02

Update: Pre-order information has been added.

Cadabra Records has announced that they will be releasing a spoken word vinyl of H.P. Lovecraft‘s “The Lurking Fear” with Andrew Leman, co-founder of the H.P. Lovecraft Historical Society, providing the reading. The artwork, which you can see below, was done by Alan Brown.

The limited 12″ will be pressed in a run of 500 of which only 350 will be available for sale (100 are already pre-sold and 50 for personal label reasons) on July 8th. Pre-orders will go live Friday, June 3rd.

An excerpt from S. T. Joshi’s liner notes reads:

Reading Lovecraft can on occasion be a guilty pleasure. When we encounter a sentence like this from The Outsider – “It was a compound of all that is unclean, uncanny, unwelcome, abnormal, and detestable”- we are inclined to smile as well as to admire the verbal pyrotechnics that can create such a cascade of evocative adjectives. Especially in his earlier years, Lovecraft enjoyed experimenting with this kind of over-the-top horror, and the results are some of his most entertaining stories. The Lurking Fear is one of these.

Written in November 1922, it was the second of Lovecraft’s professionally published stories. Weird Tales, which was the haven for most of his later tales, would not be founded until March 1923; and Lovecraft – who was not even sure he wanted to be a “professional” writer, if that meant churning out hackwork according to market specifications – wrote The Lurking Fear in response to the pleas of a friend, George Julian Houtain, who wanted just such a blood-and-thunder narrative. Houtain had begun a semi-pro magazine (which Lovecraft later called a “vile rag”) entitled Home Brew, subtitled “America’s Zippiest Pocket Magazine.” Most people don’t know that Home Brew was a humor magazine, full of articles, sketches, limericks, and other matter poles apart from Lovecraft’s usual brand of supernatural horror.

From the official press release: “Dark ambient/industrial outfit, Theologian, backs up Leman’s conveyance of the awesome story, supplying an appropriately macabre and unsettling score.

Categories: Horror News

Watch ‘Blood Bath’, Starring Jeordie White (Marilyn Manson), Right Now!

Tue, 05/24/2016 - 16:52

The horror short Blood Bath, which we wrote about earlier this year, has been released and can be watched below.

Starring Pandie Suicide (Ditch Day Massacre), Jeordie White (aka Twiggy Ramiriz from Marilyn Manson), Kimberly Ables Jindra (Paranormal Activity: The Marked Ones) and a special guest appearance from Slipknot DJ Sid Wilson, the short was written and produced by Suicide while being directed by Erik Boccio. It’s basically a twisted take on the crimes of Countess Elizabeth Bathory, who bathed in the blood of young women in an effort to maintain her youth and beauty.

Blood Bath features original music from Rob Patterson (Filter, Otep, ex-Korn) as well as an original track from 16-year-old singer/songwriter Poppy Jean Crawford. The makeup and FX were created by Laney Chantal (“Face Off”).

Categories: Horror News

‘Among the Sleep’ Wakes Up On Xbox One Next Week

Tue, 05/24/2016 - 16:36

After a slight delay caused by some unforeseen technical difficulties, Krillbite Studio has gotten the Xbox One port of their popular indie horror game Among the Sleep back on track and ready for a release on Friday, June 3rd. If you haven’t played this one yet, it’s a first-person adventure game about a two year-old boy’s quest to find his missing mother.

It’s a gorgeous game that’s elevated considerably by a lovely art style that turns a normal, everyday home into a charming place until it’s twisted into something sinister by a child’s rampant imagination. The horrors are seen through the eyes of a frightened child, who unknowingly reshapes everything he sees into a nightmarish version of itself. It’s a clever use of a common video game aesthetic, much like Krillbite’s next game, Mosaic.

Still no update on the planned retail release of Among the Sleep, but we’ll probably hear about that soon. The game is currently available to download on PC and PS4, neither of which will have the exclusive pajama patterns that Xbox One owners will get next week. I’m going with the unicorn style, but I won’t judge you if you’re more fond of the bear pajamas.

I’m afraid I can’t say the same for those of you who choose to wear the Xbox branded pajamas. What is this, Baby Billboard Simulator 2016? No thanks!

Categories: Horror News