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[TV] Eli Roth Directs “South of Hell” Pilot, Starring Mena Suvari

Tue, 10/14/2014 - 15:47

Deadline is reporting that Mena Suvari, pictured, is finalizing a deal to play the lead in WE tv‘s second original scripted series, thriller drama “South Of Hell”.

The show, which has an eight-episode straight-to-series order for a 2015 premiere, comes from horror fav Eli Roth (Cabin Fever, The Green Inferno, Hostel).

A supernatural thriller set in South Carolina, South Of Hell focuses on Maria Abascal (Suvari), a stunning demon-hunter-for-hire whose power stems from within. Like those she hunts, Maria is divided within herself, struggling with her own demon, Abigail, who resides inside of her, feeding on the evil Maria exorcises from others. Maria and Abigail share a soul and a destiny, but as Maria desperately tries to overtake Abigail, she will discover how far Abigail will go to remain a part of her.

The premiere episode of “South Of Hell” will be directed by Roth from a script by Matt Lambert.

Categories: Horror News

20 Landmarks of Found-Footage Horror!

Tue, 10/14/2014 - 15:37

Last month, I posted a list of thirteen horror mockumentaries (if you missed it, be sure to check it out), films which arguably fall outside the domain of the insanely popular postmodern film genre known as “found footage.” I also promised that I’d examine the found footage phenomenon itself in greater detail… and, ready or not, it’s time to open that creepy, controversial can of proverbial worms.

As I mentioned earlier, found footage as a film medium is the subject of endless debate, puzzlement, and often straight-up hate among horror fans – and often for good reason. It’s ironic, then, that the use of fictional film or video footage as a narrative device more or less began with one of horror cinema’s most revered entries: Ruggero Deodato’s gritty, shocking and highly controversial 1980 jungle epic Cannibal Holocaust. Oddly enough, very few genre films adopted Deodato’s revolutionary approach until nearly two decades later, when a little indie film called The Blair Witch Project exploded into a worldwide phenomenon. Following that film’s runaway success, the floodgates officially opened: hundreds of filmmakers fired up their camcorders, hoping to capitalize on the found footage craze and turn a micro-investment into box-office gold. The momentum doesn’t seem to have let up since, with major studios and respected filmmakers continuing to add their own POV shaky-cam offerings, with wildly varied results.

It’s impossible to fully rank and rate the best and worst of these due to the sheer volume of titles. Instead, I decided to compile a chronological list of film, television and web programs that made significant contributions to the found footage subgenre – whether for their originality, shocking content, high-profile creators, or popularity with audiences. I narrowed the pack down to 20 titles that meet these criteria, and I’d consider this a pretty damn definitive list, if I do say so my damn self. Still, you may have some choices of your own to add, so please do so in the comments below!

Cannibal Holocaust (1980)

The granddaddy of found footage horror, the most famous entry in Italy’s prolific cannibal exploitation genre of the ’70s and ’80s is also the best. While it’s dated a bit since its premiere, the movie-within-a-movie footage (shot on hand-held 16mm film to give it a documentary feel) still shocks the uninitiated today, and iconic images like a young woman impaled on a giant spike adorn everything from t-shirts to jewelry at horror conventions. The footage was so realistic (for its time, anyway) that director Ruggero Deodato was actually put on trial for allegedly killing his actors – some of whom were instructed to lay low for a full year to convince audiences their deaths were authentic. My only issue with this film, along with many of its cannibal brethren, is the very real inclusion of multiple scenes of violence against animals; to this day, I can only watch the “cruelty-free” version (overseen by the director), available on the DVD from Grindhouse Releasing. Eli Roth pays homage to Deodato’s vision in his latest feature The Green Inferno (recently pulled from theatrical distribution), which takes its title from Holocaust‘s doomed film-within-a-film.

Guinea Pig: Flower of Flesh and Blood (1985)

This grotesque, surreal cult video series from Japan actually began with the episode The Devil’s Experiment, but this chapter is the one that kicked off its notoriety in the US – mostly thanks to a news-making reaction from actor Charlie Sheen, who popped in a bootleg copy during a party and was reportedly convinced the horrific footage was real. Once transferred to DVD, the gore doesn’t quite stand up to close scrutiny, but I can imagine how a degraded, multi-generation VHS copy (not to mention a cocaine-addled viewer) would mask its imperfections. The plotless episode involves a madman clad in samurai armor, whose artistic subject – a young woman drugged and bound to a bed – is also his chosen medium, and we’re forced to watch him messily mutilate and dismember her still-living body in extreme and unflinching detail. Much like Cannibal Holocaust, the director of Flower was brought up on charges, and had to prove to the courts that the footage was staged. Believe it or not, the Guinea Pig series now has an American reboot (subtitled Bouquet of Guts and Gore), but I can’t imagine it recapturing the shock value of the original.

UFO Abduction a.k.a. The McPherson Tape (1989)

This early micro-budget entry, presented as camcorder footage by a rural family under siege by alien visitors, actually established most of the genre tropes that we take for granted today. The story begins as a rather dull home video of a child’s birthday party, but descends into chaos and terror when members of the family venture into the woods after seeing some strange lights. While it seems a bit clunky today (and in dire need of editing), one can imagine how chillingly believable it must have been in 1989. The “video vérité” look, now a staple of the subgenre, was entirely new to audiences at the time, but much of that realism was lost in the slicker and more widely seen remake Alien Abduction: Incident in Lakewood County, created by the same filmmakers nearly a decade later on a significantly bigger budget.

Alien Autopsy (1995)

This intriguing oddity was first brought forth by UK producer Ray Santilli and sold to TV networks around the world, under the pretense of being genuine classified footage of government scientists dissecting an alien creature recovered from a crash in Roswell, New Mexico in 1947. The grainy 17-minute black & white short reached the eyeballs of US viewers via the Fox Network special Alien Autopsy: Fact or Fiction?, and was also one of the first found footage films to generate a firestorm of debate on this newfangled thing called the Internet. Though now widely known to be a hoax, the short is still quite unsettling in its grisly realism, thanks in large part to some very convincing makeup effects. The hoax itself became the subject of the British comedy Alien Autopsy in 2006.

The Blair Witch Project (1999)

The first found footage feature to achieve massive box-office success, this labor of love by filmmakers Eduardo Sanchez and Daniel Myrick is more significant for its brilliant marketing campaign – which fully exploited that Internet thing that all the cool kids were talking about – than actual onscreen scares. In fact, much of the backlash against the film came from fans who felt robbed by the story’s lack of visceral payoff (spoiler alert: we never see a witch, or anything else of a supernatural nature). It’s still pretty damn creepy, even if seen only as a firsthand account of three naïve kids getting hopelessly lost in the wilderness. While the meta-style sequel Book of Shadows was an even greater disappointment, and a proposed prequel continues to elude us, at least Sanchez has returned this year to the genre that made him famous with the upcoming Bigfoot feature Exists.

August Underground (2001)

The notion of a snuff-style film edited from a serial killer’s home movies wasn’t a new thing by 2001; classics like Man Bites Dog and Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer had already made harrowing use of the concept. But audiences had never seen anything so utterly depraved, sadistic and puke-inducing as this splattery camcorder odyssey by gonzo auteur Fred Vogel. Presented as home movies shot by a band of psychopathic spree killers, August Underground is really more of a guerrilla show-reel for makeup effects work by Vogel’s then-fledgling company Toe Tag Productions. To say this is not for all tastes is probably the understatement of the century, as we’re presented with every possible atrocity committed against the human body; if it doesn’t happen here, it’s probably covered in one of the two August sequels. I’m not a big fan of this series, but I admire Vogel’s fearless audacity in serving up the ultimate in onscreen sadism.

Series 7: The Contenders (2001)

The first high-profile film to bring together the rising phenomena of found footage horror and reality TV, this intriguing indie entry was inspired by ’70s sci-fi films like Rollerball, but also predates dystopian survival-game epics like The Hunger Games. The premise involves a popular TV game show in which contestants are chosen by lottery, armed and pitted against each other in a literal battle to the death, with freedom awarded to the last person standing. As the title suggests, we’re on season seven of the show, where we follow the actions of a ruthless, gun-toting pregnant woman (Silence of the Lambs‘ Brooke Smith, a long way from putting lotion in the basket), a champion/survivor from two previous years, who is forced to compete one last time to win her freedom. The film fumbles a bit toward the climax, when it attempts a clumsy meta-fictional twist.

Diary of the Dead (2007)

Now we’re onto the first found-footage entry from a legendary horror director: in this case, the godfather of the modern zombie film, George A. Romero. After the tepid reception of his first big-budget zombie sequel Land of the Dead, Romero scaled down his aspirations for his next project, this time using the found footage medium to revisit and essentially reboot his undead universe. Sadly, despite a few chilling set-pieces (the shot of zombies walking on the bottom of a swimming pool, for example), it’s overall a lackluster effort, and alienated many fans of the director’s earlier classics; but it’s still significant for being the first time one of horror’s most beloved icons tackled this particular style.

Paranormal Activity (2007)

Not since Blair Witch has a found footage flick so dramatically captured the attention of audiences around the world. The two films share similar modest beginnings and rock-bottom budgets; director Oren Peli saved money by shooting in his own house with his own camera. Also like Blair Witch, Peli hired unknown actors to lend more realism to the tale of a young couple tormented by an unseen demonic presence, and he uses low-tech practical effects and a sub-bass rumble on the soundtrack (there is no musical score) to achieve simple but heart-stopping chills. The most intriguing aspect of Activity is its ability to generate maximum tension through long, unbroken takes – something unheard of in this age of ultra-short attention spans. While it screened successfully at festivals in 2007, the film failed to gain traction with distributors until none other than Steven Spielberg screened a copy; allegedly he was so freaked out that he refused to keep the screener in his bedroom. After a few modifications to the ending (including some not-so-convincing CGI effects), Paramount released the film in Fall of 2009, and the rest is history. To date, there have been three direct sequels and one spinoff (The Marked Ones), with a fifth installment now slated for release in 2016.

[REC] (2007)

While many countries have jumped aboard the found footage express, the first and best contribution from Europe is this Spanish film by Jaume Balagueró and Paco Plaza. The story involves a TV news reporter (Manuela Velasco) and her crew accompanying a fire and rescue team as they answer a call in a creepy apartment complex; once on the scene, the situation quickly goes horribly awry, with signs of a mysterious, rapidly-spreading plague surfacing throughout the building. A sure sign of a horror film’s stamp on the public consciousness is the inevitable Hollywood remake, and thus the shot-for-shot English version Quarantine hit US screens two years later, followed by its own sequel (which is neither found footage nor a remake of REC 2. Even Balagueró and Plaza abandoned the format halfway through the third installment, REC 3: Genesis, suggesting that the medium might be losing steam among more established filmmakers. The concluding chapter, REC 4: Apocalypse, recently premiered at the prestigious Toronto International Film Festival, and continues to hold to a more traditional narrative structure.

Cloverfield (2008)

Lost creator (and now hopeful Star Wars franchise savior) J.J. Abrams brought his high-concept sensibilities to the genre with this inventive giant-monster flick, which benefited from the best advance publicity campaign since Blair Witch: the theatrical teaser for the film gave audiences a shocking glimpse of the destruction to come, but didn’t reveal what might be causing it… or even the film’s title, for that matter, leading to a firestorm of online speculation befitting a vast conspiracy theory (one line of misheard dialogue led some to conclude that the film was a big-screen adaptation of Voltron!). The film’s main hook is the way it plays out much like a Godzilla flick told from the point-of-view of a few confused bystanders, who never fully grasp the extent of what’s going on until it’s too late. Abrams also crammed the film with numerous in-jokes and Easter eggs, inspiring another wave of fan theories following its home video release.

Lost Tapes (2008)

It was inevitable that found footage techniques would find their way into television series, and there are certainly plenty of examples to choose from. But possibly the most effective and memorable of the bunch is this hit series from Animal Planet, which follows the escapades of (fictional) cryptid hunters following up reports of legendary monsters – including Bigfoot, the Chupacabra, the Mothman, the Jersey Devil and the Mongolian Death Worm, to name just a few. The episodes are not always convincing, but if you buy into the illusion, there are some truly chilling moments to be found. The successful series spawned (no pun intended) the contentious mockumentaries Mermaids: The Body Found and Mermaids: The New Evidence, both of which caught flak from legit scientists for passing off their dramatizations as genuine.

Marble Hornets (2009)

Arguably the first truly successful found footage YouTube series, this ongoing project is the creation of writing/directing team Troy Wagner and Joseph DeLage, who took the pervasive urban legend of “The Slender Man” as their central theme and inspiration. The story is told mainly through the lens of a fictional film student who abandoned the title project after experiencing strange and terrifying phenomenon revolving around a tall, faceless and impossibly thin figure known as “The Operator.” He eventually surrenders his tapes to a friend, who later digs into the footage in an attempt to solve the mystery; it’s through this friend’s perspective that we view the videos, unraveling the enigma with each subsequent entry. The series became a viral sensation, generating the kind of viewership normally reserved for series television, and after three full seasons there’s currently a feature film in post-production, with Doug Jones (Hellboy) as The Operator.

The Bay (2012)

Another significant entry in the genre from a well-known filmmaker, this highly realistic, deeply disturbing and just plain gross feature from Oscar-winning director Barry Levinson was one of the most-requested titles in the comments section of my mockumentary list. Since it’s not formatted as a documentary, but as raw footage salvaged from a doomed TV news crew, I saved it for this list instead. Although it uses legit science and genuine scientific concerns about the impact of climate change to send its message, this isn’t really a preachy film, but it certainly doesn’t shy away from scare tactics and often goes straight for the gut – and I mean that quite literally. After seeing The Bay, you may never eat shellfish again… or any fish, for that matter.

Chronicle (2012)

Okay, so maybe this fascinating flick isn’t technically horror, but more of a darkly skewed sci-fi/superhero tale; still, it’s worthy of inclusion here because of some particularly chilling and heart-stopping moments. Presented as camcorder footage recorded by a group of three teenage friends who have suddenly acquired supernatural powers, the story begins as you might expect – with the kids using their abilities to play pranks and impress their classmates – but things escalate quickly, especially after one of the teens begins to see himself as a godlike being, above human laws and morality, which leads to a catastrophic showdown with his former friends. This unusual spin on superhero/supervillain themes won over audiences with some breathtaking set-pieces, including a fatal high-altitude encounter with a thunderstorm.

Sinister (2012)

I wasn’t sure what to expect from Scott Derrickson’s unique spin on found footage, but quickly found myself engrossed, surprised and occasionally shocked by what he had wrought. Framed in a traditional narrative, a box of creepy 8mm home movies – actually shot on Super-8 stock, not digitally simulated – are discovered by a true-crime author (Ethan Hawke) and presented here as raw, surreal and sometimes downright terrifying glimpses into a truly evil intelligence. The title sequence is truly the stuff of nightmares, and another 8mm clip provides one of the biggest jump-scares of that year. While it stumbles on the way to its conclusion, Sinister is still surprisingly effective in conjuring a surreal, nightmarish ambiance, aided greatly by a chilling score and sound design. Successful enough to spawn a sequel (currently in pre-production), it’s one of the most effective film-within-a-film stories in recent years.

V/H/S (2012)

A recent major player in the found footage universe, this bizarre, graphic and often shocking series unites the medium with another famed subgenre: the omnibus horror film. Tapping the talents of several up-and-coming filmmakers (Adam Wingard, Ti West, Gareth Evans, Eduardo Sanchez, and many more), these short-film anthologies employ a wide variety of video techniques and technologies to spin explicit tales of sex, gore and mayhem. For me, the first two films’ crowning moment is “Safe Haven” from V/H/S 2, set within the walls of an isolated Indonesian commune whose enigmatic cult leader has granted a film crew access to the coming apocalypse… which comes to pass in the most outrageously gruesome way imaginable. It’s so completely unhinged, throwing virtually every kind of horror imaginable at your face, that it eclipses nearly every other entry in the series. I can’t wait to see what madness awaits in the third installment, V/H/S: Viral, slated for On Demand release on October 23rd.

The Sacrament (2013)

This is a compelling hybrid of found footage and vintage exploitation from retro-influenced director Ti West (The House of the Devil). The strange events surrounding charismatic cult leader Jim Jones made headlines around the world in 1978, when his followers gunned down a U.S. congressman and his delegation and later committed mass suicide, ending with a body count of nearly a thousand. The Guyana-based community of the People’s Temple, better known as “Jonestown,” was the subject of many features since the ’70s, from documentaries to crude grindhouse fare, and West artfully brings all of those elements together in depicting a documentary crew invited into the seemingly Utopian commune of Eden Parish, only to find themselves unable to escape the grip of the creepy, all-powerful cult leader known as “Father” (played with a chilling charisma by Gene Jones). The story adheres fairly closely to several real-life moments from Jonestown’s tragic history, giving it a realistic weight – although I was puzzled by West’s choice to credit the actors in the opening titles, which completely breaks the illusion that follows.

Willow Creek (2013)

This Bigfoot tale is significant not for what transpires in front of the camera, but for who’s standing behind it – legendary comedian-turned-director Bobcat Goldthwait, whose penchant for pitch-black social commentary boosted his films God Bless America and World’s Greatest Dad to cult status. Willow Creek narrows its focus, centering on an obsessive cryptid hunter in search of Bigfoot, and his beleaguered, skeptical girlfriend. The first half of the film plays as a surprisingly gentle satire of Bigfoot mania, but soon enters Blair Witch territory as the couple come under siege in the depths of the woods near the site of the famous 1967 Patterson-Gimlin Bigfoot film (which was recently proven to be a hoax). Goldthwait keeps things nicely ambiguous until the conclusion, which unfortunately squanders the slow but intense build-up, and he doesn’t really break new ground in the genre; nevertheless, it’s still worth noting due to Goldthwait’s adept handling of sharp dialogue and sly satire.

Alien Abduction (2014)

This recent arrival, which loosely takes the same premise as 1989′s UFO Abduction and blows it up to massive proportions, gets a mention here thanks to a narrative device that solves one of the main points of contention with found footage films: why does the camera operator insist on filming when his life is clearly in jeopardy? In this case, the central point-of-view is that of an autistic boy, for whom the camera is his chosen device for interacting with his surroundings, forging an unbreakable link between the camera and its user. You may have to suspend your disbelief for much of the film’s second half (for example, the idea that a video camera can survive being dropped from low orbit is stretching things a bit), but there are some intense shocks and creeps to be found along the way.

Categories: Horror News

[Toys] A Closer Look at NECA’s “Ultimate Freddy”

Tue, 10/14/2014 - 15:16

One, two, Freddy’s coming for you…

NECA has given us a closer look at their A Nightmare on Elm Street 30th Anniversary “Ultimate Freddy” tribute figure honoring 30 years of dream-stalking terror!

NECA’s 30th Anniversary “Ultimate Freddy” features:

Three new interchangable head portraits (closed mouth, open mouth grimace, and skull face)
All new fully articulated legs (ball-hinged thighs and knees)
Alternate severed fingers left hand
Removable fedora
New tongue phone
New dead skin mask
Deluxe packaging

You’ll find even more images here.

Categories: Horror News

‘The Boy Next Door’ Poster Obsesses Over Jennifer Lopez

Tue, 10/14/2014 - 15:09

A crappy husband propels a women into making bad decisions, which leads to a young boy terrorizing the family in The Boy Next Door, in theaters January 23, 2014.

We now have the official image gallery and first poster, which pulls from one of the stills. On it, Jennifer Lopez stares intensely at a young boy.

Lopez leads the cast in The Boy Next Door, a psychological thriller that explores a forbidden attraction that goes much too far. Directed by Rob Cohen (The Fast and the Furious) and written by Barbara Curry, the film also stars Ryan Guzman, John Corbett and Kristin Chenoweth.

Obsession has never been so close.

Categories: Horror News

What Kind Of Vampire Are You?

Tue, 10/14/2014 - 15:00

Vampires are a badass villain, let’s be honest. They come out at night to feed on the blood of the innocent and are generally feared and respected. Plus, depending on the kind of vampire they are, they can be classy as hell or viciously brutal and utterly destructive.

So that begs the question, what kind of vampire would you be? Well, we’ve got just the quiz to address that! Head on below and take it for yourself!

I got “Old School – Keep it real, OG!” What did you get?

Categories: Horror News

It’s Ali Larter In ‘The Diabolical’!

Tue, 10/14/2014 - 14:58

Content and Alistair Legrand have released this first look at Final Destination and Resident Evil star Ali Larter in The Diabolical, a terrifying and intense new horror film that will mark Legrand’s directorial debut, who co-wrote the script with Luke Harvis.

“The Diabolical follows Madison and her children in their quiet suburban home as they are awoken nightly by an increasingly strange and intense presence. Madison desperately seeks help from her scientist boyfriend Nikolai, who begins a hunt to destroy the violent spirit that paranormal experts are too frightened to undertake.“!–more–>

Patrick Fischler (“Mad Men”), Arjun Gupta (“Nurse Jackie”), Merrin Dungey (“Betrayal”) and Joe Egender (“American Horror Story: Asylum”) also star.

Categories: Horror News

‘Exists’ Clip Attacked By a What?!

Tue, 10/14/2014 - 14:51

From Blair Witch director Eduardo Sanchez, Exists pits a group of twenty-somethings against the legendary Bigfoot.

For five friends, it was a chance for a summer getaway— a weekend of camping in the Texas Big Thicket. But visions of a carefree vacation are shattered with an accident on a dark and desolate country road. In the wake of the accident, a bloodcurdling force of nature is unleashed—something not exactly human, but not completely animal— an urban legend come to terrifying life…and seeking murderous revenge.

In this new clip Bigfoot doesn’t attack, but something else does…

The film stars Chris Osborn, Dora Madison Burge, Roger Edwards, Samuel Davis, Denise Williamson and Brian Steele and is produced by Jane Fleming, Mark Ordesky, Robin Cowie and J. Andrew Jenkins.

Exists hits theaters and iTunes on October 24.

See Bigfoot in this clip!

Opening in Select Theaters and On Demand on Friday, October 24, 2014

New York City at the AMC Empire 25

Los Angeles, CA at the AMC Burbank 8

Austin, TX at the Galaxy Theatres Highland 10

Chicago, IL at the AMC Country Club Hills 16

Dallas, TX at the AMC Mesquite 30

Denver, CO at the AMC Highlands Ranch 24

Houston, TX at the AMC Studio 30

Orlando, FL at the AMC Universal Cineplex 20

Philadelphia, PA at the AMC Cherry Hill 24

Phoenix, AZ at the AMC Arizona Center 24

Tampa, FL at the AMC Veterans 24

Baltimore, MD at the AMC Owings Mills 17

Categories: Horror News

Chrysalide “We Are Not Cursed” Song Premiere (Exclusive)

Tue, 10/14/2014 - 14:00

Bloody-Disgusting has teamed up with French industrial band Chrysalide to bring you the exclusive song premiere of “We Are Not Cursed”, which comes from the band’s brand new album Personal Revolution! Heavily influenced by groups like Nine Inch Nails, Skinny Puppy, and the like, play this one loud!

The band comments:

“When society as a whole has so obviously failed, power and responsibility fall back to the individual. That is our personal revolution!”

You can snag Personal Revolution via Storming The Base.

Chrysalide online:
Facebook
Twitter
Soundcloud

Categories: Horror News

Death Waltz And One Way Static Team Up For ‘Cannibal Holocaust’ Vinyl Soundtrack Release!

Tue, 10/14/2014 - 13:33

Death Waltz and One Way Static have teamed up to release the soundtrack to the 1980 Italian horror film Cannibal Holocaust, which was composed by the late Riz Ortolani. The joint release will be on sale on Friday, October 31st, perfectly timed for Halloween!

No other details have been released.

Categories: Horror News

‘TMNT’ Concept Art Reveals Krang, Bebop and Rocksteady!

Tue, 10/14/2014 - 11:50

With the alien subplot being all the press talked about leading up to the release of this summer’s blockbuster, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, it was a surprise to me that Krang didn’t make an appearance.

Now, months after release, Tsvetomir Georgiev has been granted permission to share the concept art he did for the film.

The art included his renditions of Krang, Bebop and Rocksteady, all best known from the animated series. The rights behind these characters is the main reason none of them appeared in the previous four films, which is also probably the reason they didn’t appear in the reboot. Georgiev didn’t elaborate, unfortunately. I dream of the day they all make it to film…

TMNT arrives on DVD and Blu-ray December 16th.

Categories: Horror News

Members Of Miss May I Choose Their Top 5 Horror Films

Tue, 10/14/2014 - 11:00

Ohio metalcore band Miss May I are gearing up to embark on a short US tour which sees direct support from Affiance. The tour sees dates throughout much of the Southern United States, including the band’s performance on the 25th at Slipknot‘s “Knotfest” festival.

But because it’s Halloween and the guys are huge horror fans, they’d rather talk horror than discuss the upcoming tour! This is why each member of the band has submitted their Top 5 favorite horror movies exclusively to Bloody-Disgusting! Check out each of their picks below, which range from remakes to genre classics.

You can purchase the band’s latest album Rise Of The Lion via iTunes.

Categories: Horror News

“Scooby-Doo” Horror Mashups Become a Book, and We’re Backing It!

Tue, 10/14/2014 - 10:18

Over the past few months we’ve been on the forefront of some incredible illustrations by IBTrav Illustrations & Design.

Trav put his name on the horror map with his horror mashups that would put iconic genre villains in an episode of “Scooby-Doo”. Scooby and the gang have come face-to-face with Freddy Krueger, Jason Voorhees, Ghostface, Michael Myers, and even the Monster Squad!!

After becoming an internet sensation, Trav hs decided to put said art into a new hardcover book he calls “The Lost Mysteries Collection” (full details here).

Bloody Disgusting is excited to announce that we will be partnering with IBTrav to get behind this awesome crowd-funded collectible that will be limited to only 300 pieces!

This book would compile all of the “Lost Mysteries” you have come to love PLUS new mysteries the fans have been clamoring for: I’m talking Carrie, The Shining, The Lost Boys and MORE!

I want this collection to be a quality product. One that’s printed on high quality paper like a REAL SWEET read. A book you’d find in Barnes & Noble and not WalMart, between the arts and crafts aisle and $5 DVD bin.

Each book will measure 6″x 9″. It will be hardcover bound, printed on high quality paper and in full color.

This will be a limited run of 300 books. Once they’re gone, they’re gone.

“I’m very excited about this project and hope that fellow horror fan are too! There will be lots of new art to fill this book so expect to see new mashups in the coming weeks,” Trav tells Bloody. “Also, keep your eyes peeled for updates, behind the scenes photos of the book in progress and more!

“Thanks to Bloody Disgusting and all the horror fans for their support!”

The thing I love most about this campaign is that he will also be joining up with Scares That Care and donating all proceeds above his goal amount! This is where crowd-funding becomes beautiful.

You can keep up with all the projects we get behind by bookmarking this page.

Categories: Horror News

Clementine, Telltale’s “The Walking Dead” Video Game Character, Gets McFarlane Treatment!

Tue, 10/14/2014 - 09:39

Fans of Telltale’s “The Walking Dead” video game is about to get a physical version of the game’s protagonist, courtesy of McFarlane Toys!

The official website for AMC’s “The Walking Dead” revealed that McFarlane Toys will be introducing ‘Clementine’ to their line of “Walking Dead” action figures, writes Figures.com.

The “Clem” action figure marks the first time a character from Telltale’s “The Walking Dead” video game series has been produced. Exclusively from Skybound, the Clem figure will be available in both Full Color and in Blood Splattered Color versions.

The figure will come with backpack, pistol, and hammer.

Categories: Horror News

“The Strain” Season One Dated for Home Video

Tue, 10/14/2014 - 09:23

Experience the first season of “The Strain” on December 2 – from Executive Producers-Writers Guillermo Del Toro, Carlton Cuse and Chuck Hogan – along with behind-the-scenes special features that explore the story’s journey from bestselling novel to hit show.

When a freak virus kills all but four passengers on an airplane at JFK, Ephraim Goodweather (Corey Stoll), head of the Center for Disease Control’s “Canary Team,” is immediately called to the scene. With help from a mysterious Holocaust survivor (David Bradley), “Eph” and his colleague (Mía Maestro) uncover the outbreak’s ties to vampirism. Now, the only way to stop the terrifying disease from wiping out mankind is to face its source – a sinister supernatural creature known as “The Master” – whose evil intent seems more powerful than any other force on Earth!

Special Features include: In the Beginning, A Novel Approach, and Setrakian’s Lair.

Categories: Horror News

Even More “The Walking Dead” Bad Lip Reading!

Tue, 10/14/2014 - 09:16

Did you know that on AMC’s “The Walking Dead” there’s hidden dialogue right underneath your very eyes? If you were to mute the show, the real dialogue appears. Take this, for example, where Rick Grimes and Daryl Dixon fight over gluing hair to mannequins.

Seriously though, this isn’t real, it’s part of a fun video series called “Bad Lip Reading,” where they take movies and shows and change the dialogue. It’s seriously some of the funniest shit you’ll see on the Web.

In fact, this is part 2 of “The Walking Dead” – you can watch the first bad lip-reading here!

“The Glue Police, that’s not a real thing you can be.”

Get more Halloween Treats!

Categories: Horror News

[Podcast] Whatever – October 14th, 2014 – “The ALIEN Within”

Tue, 10/14/2014 - 09:09

This week, horror games make a triumphant return as Don and Justin go in-depth with “Alien: Isolation,” and Justin reviews the highly-anticipated “The Evil Within.” Finally, in a different kind of horror, Don reviews the $60 “Sleeping Dogs: Definitive Edition.” All this, and maybe even a haunted house experience or five await you on the latest edition of Whatever.

As always, you can find us on iTunesSoundCloud, or YouTube.

Leave a comment below, head to our Facebook page, or hit us up on Twitter, and let us know your thoughts!

Categories: Horror News

After Dark’s ‘Sanatorium’ Dumped to DVD

Tue, 10/14/2014 - 09:02

From After Dark Films comes the next installment of After Dark Originals, Sanatorium. The story about life after death and the evil force that remains, arrives on DVD (plus Digital), Digital HD and On Demand December 23 from Lionsgate Home Entertainment.

On New Year’s Eve in 1955, Richard Howell, a patient at the Hillcrest Sanatorium, went on a bloody, child-killing rampage, before he hanged himself. Fifty-six years later, a team of ghost hunters – from the popular TV series “Ghost Trackers” – prepares to spend the night at the sanatorium. They hope to capture paranormal activity for the entertainment of their show’s fans. Instead, they unleash a horrifying force of evil…hell-bent on their destruction.

Sanatorium is directed and written by Brant Sersen (Blackballed: The Bobby Dukes Story, Splinterheads), starring Kate Riley (College Humor), Megan Neuringer (Kroll Show) and Don Fanelli (Inside Amy Schumer).

Categories: Horror News

‘The Devil’s Hand’ Reaches For Home Video

Tue, 10/14/2014 - 08:56

Terror descends upon a devout community when The Devil’s Hand grabs hold on DVD (plus Digital) and Digital HD December 16 from Lionsgate Home Entertainment. Theatrically released in 2014, the new haunter is available On Demand now. T

he satanic flick from Academy Award-nominated filmmaker Christian E. Christiansen (Best Short Film, Live Action, “At Night,” 2008), stars Rufus Sewell (Dark City, The Illusionist), with Jennifer Carpenter (Showtime’s “Dexter,” Quarantine, The Exorcism of Emily Rose) and Golden Globe nominee Colm Meaney (AMC’s “Hell on Wheels,” Con Air).

The Devil’s Hand tells the tale of six girls born on the sixth day of the sixth month, setting in motion an ancient prophecy-on their 18th birthday, one of the girls will become the Devil’s Hand. As the day nears, the young women begin to disappear. Threatened by the town’s fiery religious leader (Meaney), the remaining girls, Mary and Ruth, join with Mary’s father (Sewell) to uncover the chilling truth behind the evil that grips New Bethlehem.

Categories: Horror News

‘The Evil Within’ Review: Running Scared

Tue, 10/14/2014 - 02:34

This is an exciting day for fans of the survival horror genre. The last few years haven’t been easy on us. It’s been tough watching one promising horror franchise after another fall, from Dead Space to Condemned. This year has gone a long way in changing that, as new installments in the Alone in the Dark, Fatal Frame and Silent Hill series, among others, have been announced.

2014 is an epoch for the genre, and games like Alien: Isolation and The Evil Within are just the beginning.

In 1996, game director Shinji Mikami brought us Resident Evil, the first in what would eventually become the most successful horror franchise ever, video games or otherwise. In 2005, he proved there’s always room for innovation, even for a series that was at the top of its game, with the hugely influential Resident Evil 4.

And we mustn’t forget about Shadows of the Damned, a hugely underrated collaboration between Mikami, Suda 51 (No More Heroes, Lollipop Chainsaw), and Silent Hill series composer Akira Yamaoka.

With The Evil Within, Mikami is returning to his roots. This is his answer to the years of outcries from Resident Evil fans who have been upset with the more bombastic direction Capcom has taken with the series. This game is the antithesis to that. It’s terrifying, intense, and despite its flaws — more on that in a bit — this is the game that may finally breathe some life into AAA survival horror.

I won’t bury the lead. This game isn’t perfect. Its visuals are a bit dated, the story has some pacing issues, and the wonky camera has a tendency to add frustration to close encounters. If you’re able to look past those quirks, you’ll find a game that’s worth losing sleep over.

My favorite thing about The Evil Within may be the surprisingly deep level of strategy that Mikami and Co. will force out of you. Early on, even basic enemies — dubbed the Haunted — will offer a challenge, even for survival horror veterans. Before they can outstay their welcome, Mikami throws more capable baddies, like Laura, the four-armed blood witch, the chainsaw-wielding Sadist, or the Boxman at the player. No one enemy ever outstays its welcome.

When I previewed the game back in May, I was worried the arsenal of weapons detective Sebastian Castellanos has at his disposal — including a pistol, shotgun, grenades, and a devilish weapon called the Agony Crossbow — would make surviving the hordes of monsters that populate this game too easy.

Thankfully, that’s not the case.

Whether you’re combating a gaggle of Haunted villagers or one of the game’s mini-bosses, every situation requires a certain level of strategy. Ammo is often scarce, so you’ll need to scour every inch of these beautifully realized nightmare locales to find the few precious resources that have been scattered about them.

Using the environment to your advantage is also key.

The Evil Within borrows from a handful of different genres, including stealth games. Sebastian can hide in lockers and under beds when necessary, either to survive or to help him to better sneak up behind an enemy. There are all sorts of environmental hazards, too, from exploding barrels and a variety of traps that can either hurt or help you in a pinch.

The Agony Crossbow will be the weapon you’ll need to learn your way around the quickest, as it will quickly prove the most useful. Its bolts come in a variety of flavors, including tips that freeze, electrocute, burn and explode enemies. They can be fired directly onto an unsuspecting baddie, or placed in the way of an oncoming group. When fired at the ground, the bolts become proximity mines, allowing strategic types plenty of room to be creative.

This room for ingenuity extends to Sebastian himself, who can be “upgraded” by paying a visit to nurse Tatiana in the dreamlike hub world where you can invest the green goop gathered from slain enemies or in jars that you’ll find all over the place to make Sebastian more adept at whoopassery. This gel can be used to improve his abilities (health, stamina), weapons (damage, firing/reload speed) and inventory size.

This results in a satisfying sense of progression. You’ll become more capable over time, but Mikami and friends have done a fine job in limiting Sebastian’s skillset so as to keep the player from ever becoming too confident in their abilities.

Much like the Otherworld in Silent Hill, the environments are always changing. It’s almost as if we’re flipping between channels on a television that only plays horror movies. Ghost towns, cemeteries, forgotten labs, empty mansions, labyrinthine networks of underground tunnels; the environments in The Evil Within run the gamut of scary-places-I-really-don’t-want-to-die-in.

The Evil Within has a tendency to try too hard to be scary. Its liberal use of barbed wire and copious amounts of gore may turn off some folks, but it works. If you’ve ever had a particularly awful nightmare, this is sort of like that, only it’s 8-10 hours long and won’t leave you wide-eyed and sweaty in your bed late at night.

Or, maybe it will.

The graphics are somewhat disappointing, especially when it comes to Sebastian’s friends. Detectives Julie “Kid” Kidman and Joseph Oda look like they came from the last generation of consoles. The lack of detail in their faces and how they’ve been animated become especially noticeable when they’re seen in close vicinity to one of the game’s monsters.

Every monster you’ll come across will be memorable, but for a game with such a paltry supporting cast, more attention should have been spent on making them believable. Then there’s the main baddie, Ruvik.

Ah, yes. Ruvik. Garbed in a white robe, with a hood pulled menacingly over his messed up face, it’s clear Ruvik has a bone to pick with, well, pretty much everyone. This guy’s pissed, and you’ll have to stick with it to find out why. He wouldn’t rank high on my list of favorite video game antagonists, but he was interesting enough to keep me interested in figuring out just what the hell his problem is.

The Evil Within isn’t perfect, but it is great. No enemy or environment ever stays long enough to grow repetitive, because the game does a great job in introducing new elements to keep the pace going. It gives me hope that there’s still room for games like Resident Evil 4, even ten years later.If you have the stomach for it, this is a game you won’t want to miss.

The Final Word: The Evil Within is a terrifying patchwork of nightmares that could only have been stitched together by a mind as delightfully twisted as Resident Evil creator Shinji Mikami.

Categories: Horror News

[TV Review] “Penny Dreadful” Episode 1.2, ‘Séance’

Mon, 10/13/2014 - 20:48

Continuing our catch-up of “Penny Dreadful,” now that it’s recently become available for purchase, we discuss the second episode, “Séance,” and dear lord this episode is powerful. It’s a stunningly intense hour, primarily due to two of gothic literature’s greatest characters: Frankenstein’s Monster and Dorian Gray.

In “Séance,” Sir Malcolm Murray continues his search for his missing daughter Mina. This includes further research of the vampire corpse from “Night Work,” which brings Victor Frankenstein back into the company of Murray and Ives as well as gives Ferdinand Lyle (Simon Russell Beale), the flamboyantly magnificent Egyptologist, much more desired screen time. Meanwhile, Ethan Chandler generally does nothing of real importance. His moments in this episode serve the storyline only to introduce Irish prostitute Brona Croft (Billie Piper) and very subtly heighten the intrigue on his mysterious past (and present for that matter). Perhaps most importantly, “Séance” introduces the viewer to a major force and popular literary character, Dorian Gray, who completely seduces this episode. And last but not least, the story takes a considerable amount of time to delve into Frankenstein’s Monster.

One cannot describe “Séance” without discussing the titular scene: a (wait for it) séance held by Lyle. It’s a lively event that ends on an insanely demonic note. The problem occurs when the medium conducting the séance (from whom you get the impression is simply a source of entertainment and not legitimate) is overcome by a dark presence claiming that there is “another here” referring to Ives and the possible dark presence residing within her. Then, for nearly six minutes…all hell breaks loose and Eva Green gives one of the most evocative and chaotic performances for a television audience. We’re talking six minutes carried completely by Green. Too much is revealed or hinted at during this scene for me to talk about it explicitly. But I will say that it deals greatly with Mina and some serious family issues. And also, it’s super not safe for work. Unless you work in a place where it’s okay to say the word “cunt” a lot. A lot. This is the type of performance that does not leave you any time soon. It’s also the type of performance that is difficult to watch more than once, so watch close and listen well the first time.

As I mentioned in my “Night Work” review, the darkness of Ives’ soul is constantly called into question, and this episode reveals a great deal about her “darkness.” Especially in a scene where Lyle analyzes the vampire hieroglyphics. The scene is a follow up to Frankenstein’s earlier analysis that the hieroglyphics—that cover the vampire’s body from head to toe—are from the Egyptian Book of the Dead. They deal with the Egyptians’ goal of transmutation to an “afterlife of something more profound—eternal life.”

As with the Frankenstein analysis, Lyle’s look into the markings is also extremely brief yet a lot of information is revealed. Frankly, those types of scenes always annoy me. Yes, this is a paranormal/supernatural horror but there are still parts that need to remain practical and when things are “figured out” too quickly, credibility seems to blow away like a wisp of hair. Regardless, Lyle comes to some hard and fast conclusions about both the hieroglyphics and Ives. Both dangerous and both extremely important to the mythology of “Penny Dreadful.” Upon realizing the extreme threat that Murray is dealing with, Lyle delivers a swift warning to stay away from whatever it is he’s after.

This scene with Lyle might be my biggest grievance with the episode. Aside from the fact that it was a complete info dump, his parting words to Murray are very presumptuous and have little ground to stand on. It’s as if the writers gave way to practicality for the sake of moving the story along quickly. Things are muddied; the markings on the vampire corpse start to fuse with Ives and at this point we simply have no clue of knowing where that’s headed.

The time spent with Frankenstein and his monster, Proteus, is magnificent. It’s exactly the type of slow burn drama this show needs to balance out the horror and sexuality. Treadaway offers an eager, fascinated portrayal of Frankenstein. He completely nails the essence of Mary Shelley’s young doctor and the raw curiosity that got him into so much trouble. Proteus portrays The Monster in a beautifully sad performance. The necessary intimacy between him and the doctor is palpable. His emotions are exposed to the viewer and are very potent. He captures the childlike wonder of The Monster without losing the underlying fear.

Dorian Gray, both in literature and in his depiction in “Penny Dreadful” is the essence of psychosexual horror. He is first introduced to us by way of Croft as he takes nude photographs of her and later engages is some emotionally disturbing sex with her. There is no way to describe how sexually charged and horrifying this initial scene becomes. Perhaps I’ll just drop a quote to encapsulate the heavy shit we’re getting into, “I’ve never fucked a dying creature before. Do you feel pain more deeply?” For some viewers, Reeve Carney might take some getting used to as Dorian Gray, but I absolutely adored his interpretation. He’s brash and arrogant, but sexy, compassionate, empathetic, and lovely. There’s inquisitiveness in him that I find so inherently attractive. Some might find him too “deep” compared to the Gray from literature who’s definitely more selfish. But I think it played out splendidly.

Overall: fantastic episode. It’s bookended by two extremely gruesome and shocking scenes, is filled with profoundly haunting performances, lighted occasionally by the lovely Croft and Proteus’ lust for life, and sizzles with Green’s unspeakable sexual energy.

What did you think of “Séance”? Is this show faring well for you thus far? Worth the purchase?

Categories: Horror News