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Desert of Blood

Review by: 
Catwalk
Release Date: 
2008
Studio: 
Encantado Films
Genre: 
Horror
Format: 
DVD
Region: 
0 NTSC
Aspect Ratio: 
1.78:1
Directed by: 
Don Henry
Cast: 
Justin Quinn
Brenda Romero
Naim Thomas
Movie: 
2
Extras: 
1
Bottom Line: 
2

 Desert of Blood is the story of Luis Diego (Quinn), a vampire outcast and entombed for nearly 35 years.  Unleashed by a would-be treasure hunter (and his hot blonde girlfriend), Diego is hell-bent on getting revenge on the inhabitants of Tecate, Mexico.
 
I think I mentioned it when I watched Last House on the Left.  Put a good kill or a hot body before the opening credits and I’m a sucker to see more.  Desert of Blood has a hot blonde and a mediocre kill, which was enough.  The film already showed promise by offering up a starkly beautiful desert environment.  Let’s see what happens when the lights go down.
 
Then the film shoots off to Malibu to witness three poolside babes talking about what they consider sensual.  Then it goes to a Latin transporter shooting the guy who hired him for shortchanging him.
 
Huh?
 
The transporter, Carlos, is soon introduced to Diego (the vampire, not the kid who rescues animals on Nickelodeon).  Soon the two are business partners with very different goals.  Diego continues on his path for revenge while battling the honor he once had as a human.  It is a battle for him to try and reclaim what he once loved and the need to kill.
 
Desert of Blood is set against a beautiful desert backdrop with vibrant colors by day and deep shadows by night.  This provides far enough ends of the spectrum to allow for contrast and scene setting.  Injecting the stereotypical airheads from the college doesn’t add anything to the mix.  It simply puts more characters in the film for the sake of a few jokes and some eye candy.
 
There is a very fluid exchange of emotions between the characters, specifically Chris, Maricela and Diego.  There are also a handful of one-liners that fit into the flow of the film well.
 
At its core, Desert of Blood features the great idea of nobility in its core villain.  There’s just too much other hoopla and filler going on that distracts from Diego’s struggle.  Overall, it’s an entertaining film with beautiful visuals and above average acting, but diving deeper into a few core characters would serve it better than spreading out.
 
The special edition DVD is shot in 1.78:1 widescreen with Dolby digital 5.1 sound.  The film runs 88 minutes.

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