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Litte Corey Gorey

Review by: 
Catwalk
Release Date: 
1993
Studio: 
Push One Stop Prod.
Genre: 
Com/Horror
Format: 
DVD
Region: 
1 NTSC
Aspect Ratio: 
N/A
Directed by: 
William Morroni
Cast: 
Todd Fortune
Pat Gallagher
Brenda Pope
Movie: 
0
Extras: 
0
Bottom Line: 
0

 Corey’s life is living hell, since his stepmom (Gallagher) and stepbrother (Sachs) abuse him repeatedly. When he accidentally injures Biff and makes the move to chop him up, then tie up his Stepmom and starve her, things start to go downhill. Then he has the complications of his brother’s coke dealer and the prissy bitch at school he’s trying to attract; the typical life of a troubled kid in the suburbs.
 
Every time this youngster comes home, he gets beat to the tune of a lousy voiceover by his stepmom. Then the brilliant social commentary; the neighbors shake their heads and turn the other way. This is the plight of Corey (Fortune), left to survive at the hands of his evil step-family like a heavy metal Cinderella.
 
He’s also pretty much a stalker and he runs like a girl…and steals panties. So much for the building sympathy thing. At least he’s the least evil of the Gorey family.
 
Corey’s stepbrother, Biff, steals Corey’s Ozzy tickets and his would-be girlfriend. In the ensuing conflict, Biff loses his hand in a manner that proves sometimes, just sometimes, an editor should look at the writer of a screenplay and ask, “exactly how much blow does it take to make you think anyone will believe this shit?”
 
Biff is the launching pad, and Corey’s life gets worse. He starves his stepmom, becomes slave to the hair metal whore, and his tv only shows two things; a serial killer or a KISS-ripoff band called Creature.
 
Corey Gorey should be called Corey Haim, since he looks a lot like the far more talented actor. Actually, with the scar and black eye, he looks like Mark Hamill after his car crash in 1976. Stepmom is doing her best Roseanne impersonation, without so much class. The only respectable thing in the movie is the huge abundance of product placement. The good folks at Coors and Stove Top must be thrilled.
 
Either this is a period piece or just filmed over a weekend in 1988. The attempted hair metal on the soundtrack is abysmal cheese. Other notables; the editing is a mess with appearing and re-appearing props, and the neighbor girl bounces a basketball in almost every scene, despite the fact that no one in miles appears to own a hoop.

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